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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
we can go back to the exciting ideas that can lead to the next waves in the economy. the other one is the political environment -- sorry. it can be hard to ignore, but were going to do it. another piece of the political environment, where we had the ability to fix the situation. we know to fix this. we needed a comprehensive dead deal that's big enough to stabilize the debt and we'll remember that. when you're trying to balance the budget. were not very. were not going to be there soon. you have to make sure that that's not faster than the economy and it's on a downward path and the problem is so big or too calm% year to look at every part of the budget. you have to look at defense spending. you have to clearly focused on health care costs, which go faster than the economy. we have to fix our social security system, which makes promises bigger than what we can pay out on the road. we have to raise revenues. we started down the path, but we haven't looked had to do about overhauling tax system, which would you want to raise revenue, you could do in could do in the way bad for the ec
similar things and have also had some success in creating more monetary policy support for the economy. >> you had mentioned that there has been evidence that the longer-term interest rates have come down to the initial round. concern is that the unemployment rate remains very high and activity would try to bring that down and one would hope to see additional movements from the most recent round. are you suggesting that one would need to be patient? needs a little bit more about how you would assess how this is having the kind of effect that you would anticipate? >> well, we will be doing that on a regular basis. we will be looking at the impact on financial markets and we will see some effect there. we will look to see whether or not the labor market situation. we first started talking about a .1% on employment, there has been some movement. there was nearly 40% of the unemployed having been out of work for six months or more. that is a situation where there are too many people i can give you specific criteria except to say that we will be assessing the impact of our actions a financi
talked about politics and about constitution, institutions. we talked about the economy although we've alluded to this aspect to it let me ask you to take off your journalist hat and put on your markets have and ask a simple question is venezuela going to buy, sell or hold? >> i think what we are going to see in the short term is a great deal of turmoil to reverse of markets -- capital flees some certainty. so, right now you have on uncertainty because nobody knows what's going to happen. nobody knows that he's alive or dead or on life support although we did hear from his brother yesterday that he is not in a coma. we thought he was either in a, or on life support. now we know he is not. other really insightful information we've gotten from the regime or that he's in a stationary situation. i have no idea what that means. that is a stationary situation. >> his treatment was being assimilated. they are still using that, his treatment is being assimilated. so we haven't really had any insight into whether chavez is going to make it or not. the prospects are probably that he is not. w
the gulf we recognize that healthy echo systems also can mean healthy economies. and from louisiana what we have taken, what we believe is a very good first effort in addressing both the vulnerability that exist with the state's master plan has which is is a long-term plan addressing the ecological but reducing the risk across the coast. we believe we can achieve a 100-year protection for the community it's the resources that important. the ecological resource that's state provides and the gulf provides to the nation that if it's going to be afforded through the nation it has to provide protection to those communities who provide that. we believe that this plan we can have sustainable long-term healthy echo systems but also healthy communities and economies. there's an essence a form of what we call social engineering. if you can't ensure the communities, the supermarkets, the schools the things that community depend on, they will not survive. we want to make sure that we're developing both a healthy echo logical system but -- we have gone a long way in first attempt. it's not perfect. we h
the way the move freight that fuels our economy. map 21 streamlines and consolidates programs and map 21 helps to shorten project delivery a priority for president obama and congress. when we deliver projects faster, when we deliver their benefits faster. like enhancing safety, less congestion and a cleaner environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 based on an innovative -- innovation initiative known as everyday counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with every day that counts. let's hear it for decter menendez and what he has done and what his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's thp. better, faster and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, a big thanks goes to peter rogoff. in the train crash your and 10, peter and i decided that we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportation into the transit safety business and thanks to all of h
, growthing -- growing faster than the economy. we have to fix the social security system making promises that are bigger than which we can pay out down the road. .. but he recognizes the threat it putouts there in the economy in that you can't possibly imagine the real growth coming without a sense of stability. the with coming from knowing what these changes will be so you could have planning investments, job creation, all the necessary pieces of moving the economy forward. the big wild card is when people are going to make these tough choices instead of using them to fight in the normal political boxes. what is going to happen next? it's on a different path than i would have thought. if you think about the prospect theory which basically says when you're delivering good news you want to do it in lots of little pieces if they got a promotion than you want to tell them they got a raise and then tell them they got a bigger office. each piece of big news is good and makes people happier. if you were doing bad use and waiting for an airline that is going to be delayed. i think it really app
on that investment? are you benefiting from that? is there enough tax being generated in the economy to offset that and when a disaster occurs are you on the hook for all the infrastructure and everything else that may be required to rebuild that community? and isha return on that exposure greater than what your payoff would he? now the taxpayer, the answer unfortunately is too often now. we have subsidized risk to a point where as long as no extreme event occurs, it seems okay. but when the extreme event occurs you are now exposed to much greater costs without necessarily generating revenue or other societal benefits offsetting that risk. now, through the 70s and 80s and early '90s, when a lot of growth was taking place in growing coastal areas and other areas very few storms were occurring. the frequency was down so the illusion was i a pitcher for 3030 years and this never happened. the problem with climate and weather is 30-year cycles are like an eyelash in understanding how these systems work. notts talking about any other issues and now we find ourselves in this increased activity and y
the economy collapse. and in classic washington fashion, this is the case with the schoolhouse is on fire and rather than focusing on putting the fire out, everyone in washington runs out to use as much water. the budget deficit is the economy right now. that's the to 50 minute like that but that's the truth. i think it would be great if an organization with strength and integrity of a or b. would stand up and make the point because we're having an entire budget that is basically premised on something that is not true. >> i agree with you. we do have underlying pieces of our economy that need to get fixed. but massive change in spending and we've already cut a trillion dollars over all in spending. we've cut medicare as part of the political their act. we have to be really careful and just solving these problems by cutting spending. .. >> we do it in a way that supports families and the population that we have. >> let me just add to that. i agree with you, but unfortunately, most of the people on social security will be on fixed budgets. and so there's still a danger having out-of-pocket
that the slaves produced for their masters and that made up the core of the southern economy. and only slave labor, only the labor of people who were owned outright by their owners, by landowners who had no right to object, much less to refuse the conditions under which they were compelled to work, only slave labor would cultivate those crops intensively and cheaply enough to yield the tremendous profits that they did. slavery's importance to the southern elite was not simply a matter of dollars and cents. to many masters, as slave owners liked to be called, slavery appeared to be an essential, even an irreplaceable fixture of society. it was inseparable from everything that they knew and loved. it was inseparable from all aspects of what they refer to as their way of life. of course, economically but also socially and culturally. slavery was the unique basis of the particular outlook, the assumptions, the norms, the habits, the relationships to which these masters had become deeply and reflectsively attached -- reflectsively attached. it defined their culture, it shaped their religion, it even sh
. the creation of a representative democracy across 13 large land areas that have different economies, different modes of production, very different religious values and different histories, a very different outlook on things. when they came together, i think that the 55 people who gathered in philadelphia had most of them, not all of them, most of them had an imperative that they were going to create something like a representative democracy or republic of all of these different elements, and they have almost everything but that and they can with a whole lot of different ideas about what they were going to do. and nobody came away with exactly what they wanted. most people didn't come away with anything close to what they wanted except that a very remarkable thing. >> host: these are very polarized times. the congress and the 79 piece is as polarized as today in your book if we think the media is polarized or in tents today and we haven't seen anything with compared to then. so how were they able to compromise than in the similarly polarized times it is hard to compromise that. >> guest: they d
of a representative democracy across 13 large land areas that have different economies, different modes of production, different religious values, different histories, different outlooks on things. when they came together, the 55 who gathered in philadelphia had most of them, not all of them. most of them had an imperative that they were going to create something like a representative democracy out of all these different element. they had to give up almost everything but that. they came with a lot of different ideas about what they were going to do and nobody came away with what they wanted. except a very remarkable thing. >> host: these are very polarized times. congress and the 1790s is as polarized. if we think the media polarized our intent today, we have been anything. so how were they able to compromise plan went similarly polarized times it's hard for us to compromise them? >> guest: they didn't like it better than we liked it. somebody said in the ever been able to track this boat. maybe you know who sent it. politics is compromise, everything else is theater. we have a lot of theater right n
across 13 large land areas that had different economies and different modes of production, different religious values, different histories, different outlooks on things. when they came together, i think that the 55 people who gathered in philadelphia had most of them -- though not all of them but most of them had an imperative that they were going to create something like a representative democracy or a republic out of all of these different elements, and they had to give up almost everything but that. they came with a whole lot of different ideas about what they were going to do, and nobody came away with exactly what they wanted. most people didn't come away with anything close to what they wanted except that very remarkable thing. >> host: now, these are very polarized times with congress in the 1790s polarized or more polarized than today. in your book you think the media is polarized today we haven't seen anything so how were they able to compromise than well it's hard for us to compromise now? >> guest: they didn't like it any better than we like it and they got mad about it. i
, when you consider the impact of drought in the economy, in some nations in africa it has been up to 9% of the gdp of the nation's. for instance, in zimbabwe or even in kenya. so when you consider all this, i think more need to be done for preparedness and for early action. unfortunately the question is why is it the information on early, early warning, i think it's because first, drought is not a kind of charismatic disaster. it's not like tsunami or earthquake. it has little subterranean impact. second, we're experiencing more frequent drought. we are reluctant to take action on early warning because maybe they're concerned about taking action and being found wrong. so uncertainty is something that scientists alike. i think my third point also might be that one might say why should we act so early? we may undermine the capacity of committee. so when you put all these together, you may have some reasons why early warning is not leading to early action. >> thanks for the question. this issue crosses pretty much everything we are going to hear. why you said that information about the fu
that we have a uniform rule of economy gent circumstances. that, her suggestion complies with your objection. >> well, if i'm understanding it correctly, i think our point is this, which is that the police officers have to act reasonably in the situation. in the situation they know for sure the evidence is going to be lost, they know that every minute is critical, for example -- >> so many situations in which we require a warrant, nevertheless. when there's drug dealing in a house, every time -- it's almost a certainty that they're going to use the drugs, and that evidence is going to disappear. you rely on knowing that there's likely to be telltale signs left over. and that's the same thing you do in an alcohol situation. you rely on the testimony of the police officer, you rely on the implied consent presumption. it's not as if this is destruction of all evidence. and not like a fleeing situation where someone gets away, you have nothing left. this is vastly different. >> i mean, with respect we disagree. this evidence is critical, and the number matters. i mean, it is the case t
in the economy before he was inaugurated and nobody knew what he was going to do and people said that they should have sent signals. it would have helped the country but it seems like it helped them do a better job waiting. we've two of them for president now and the fiscal crisis and the war going on and everybody is wondering what is going to happen. what advice would you give to mccain or obama of the should do once they are elective or should they wait until they are inaugurated to say what they are going to do? >> the question is if i could repeat, another excellent question. the parallel between lincoln and fdr not doing anything in the four months that they faced the real crisis as compared to the crisis the next president will inevitably face and whether he should be involved. i will say quickly as daniel weinberg knows one of the inspirations for the book was jonathan alter's book on clinton's roosevelt first 100 days with strong sections on the president-elect and i still remember vividly which is the good thing about the book remember building reza on march 2nd or 3rd. you've got to do
resignation as the economy was recovered? all the way back to the french and indian war, a very young george washington was riding very romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. her name was sally terry fairfax, very attractive, older, sophisticated neighbor. what if washington's letters have become public during the for -- french and and -- ran the french and indian war. not the first and not the worst. patraeus is not the first and not the worst. been there done that. it pains me to say that even abraham lincoln visited prostitutes. say it isn't so. but it happens. now, the details on a sketchy. there are not a lot of letters written about this, but here is so we can piece together. lincoln's best friend was joshua speed. he was, perhaps, a dashing and handsome and i guess what you with the ladies as lincoln was allegedly only an awkward and of lucky in romance. he felt sorry for lincoln. invited him to work in his general store. and he did not have a place to stay. he let him stay of stairs of the general store. during their steve was using the services of a professional wo
's about the health of our city, our towns. it's about the health of our neighborhoods and our economy. it's about the health of our schools, and our school children, and our communities and the health of our neighbors. mayor bloomberg, the people of new york have seen is an effective, results oriented mayor, one of the most effective results oriented mayors ever to serve new york, or dare i say, any city. creating jobs, expanding opportunity, improving city schools, launching america's largest affordable housing initiative. quite honestly, everything they do in new york and said to be the largest initiative, but i should say also largest and one of the most innovative affordable housing initiatives. and also fighting crime. really showing us that the people of new york have shown the people of baltimore that it is possible to make a safer tomorrow, that we do not have to resign ourselves to the circumstances of the way things have always been, or what we have never been able to do in the past. and, in fact, we can save lives, and each life is precious. each life is important, and if you s
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)